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Showing 10 results from a total of 265

| Issue 6

Counting Buttons: demonstrating the Hardy-Weinberg principle

Pongprapan Pongsophon, Vantipa Roadrangka and Alison Campbell from Kasetsart University in Bangkok, Thailand, demonstrate how a difficult concept in evolution can be explained with equipment as simple as a box of buttons!

Ages: 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Biology
 

| Issue 6

Monastic ink: linking chemistry and history

One of the many purposes of science is to support the humanities. With this in mind, Gianluca Farusi and his students set out to investigate and prepare iron-gall ink, a historically significant material for the transmission of knowledge.

Ages: 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Biology, Chemistry
     

| Issue 6

DNA labs on the road

Ever wished you could borrow a PCR machine for your lessons? And perhaps an expert to show your students how to use it? Marc van Mil introduces DNA labs that bring genomics directly to the classroom.

Ages: 16-19;
Topics: Biology, Health
   

| Issue 5

Travel wisely: the globe is warming!

Elisabeth Schepers from the Deutsches Museum in Munich, Germany, introduces a school programme linking climate change and the future of traffic technology.

Ages: <11, 11-14, 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Earth science, General science
   

| Issue 5

Using music in the science classroom

Caroline Molyneux, from Balshaw’s Church of England High School, UK, explains how she kick-starts her classes and helps her students remember certain lessons, facts or concepts.

Ages: 11-14, 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Science and society, General science
       

| Issue 5

Fun with genomes: the Mycomuncher DNA Puzzle

Fed up with explaining genomes, genes and proteins? Why not get your students to figure it out for themselves using Johan Leveau’s DNA puzzle?

Ages: <11, 11-14, 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Biology
       

| Issue 4

A fresh look at light: build your own spectrometer

Take a CD and a cereal box, and what do you have? With a little help from Mark Tiele Westra, your very own spectrometer! Time to explore the delights of colour, hidden in the most prosaic of objects.

Ages: 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Physics
             

| Issue 4

Scientists@work

Teaching science in the classroom is all very well, but wouldn’t it be wonderful to let your students learn for themselves what it’s really like to work in a research laboratory? Sooike Stoops from the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Belgium, describes a project that does just…

Ages: 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Biology, General science