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Showing 10 results from a total of 466

| Issue 3

Bringing global climate change to the classroom

Ivo Grigorov from the EurOCEANS project describes how the deep seas can help us to understand and predict climate change.

Ages: 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Biology, Earth science, General science
     

| Issue 3

ESOF 2006: science close up and personal

How do I become a star-chaser? How do we recognise particles that we don’t know? When will fusion power become available to mankind? Sabina Griffith from the European Fusion Development Agreement in Garching, Germany, describes the guided round-the-world trip through the science of the EIROforum…

Ages: 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Events

| Issue 3

Catch a Star! and win an astronomical competition!

Catch a Star!, an international competition for school students, is starting its fifth year. Douglas Pierce-Price from ESO invites students from all over the world to take part.

Ages: <11, 11-14, 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Events
 

| Issue 3

Putting the buzz back into school grounds

Dave Goulson and Ben Darvill from the Bumblebee Conservation Trust at the University of Stirling, UK, explain why these furry insects are under threat – and what schools can do to help.

Ages: <11, 11-14, 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Biology, General science
 

| Issue 3

Kleine botanische Experimente, By Hilke Steinecke and Imme Meyer

The book, written in German, describes a great variety of experiments using plants. The experiments are at different levels of difficulty and often explain everyday observations. The chapter titles focus on certain parts of plants and provide detailed information on plant physiology. The required…

Ages: 11-14, 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Resources
 

| Issue 1

Running one of the world’s largest telescopes

Ever wondered what - and who - lies behind the beautiful and fascinating astronomical photographs and observations made with modern telescopes? Douglas Pierce-Price from ESO, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, describes a day in the life of the Very…

Ages: 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Physics, Astronomy / space
       

| Issue 1

Spiders in Space : a collaboration between education and research

An ambitious Australian school project sent spiders into space to experience microgravity. 'Spiders in Space' will form the basis of a future project involving many more schools worldwide. Lachlan Thompson and Naomi Mathers, from RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, explain how it all started.

Ages: 14-16;
Topics: Biology, Astronomy / space, General science